Thursday 21 October 2021

Polifort acquires HandsOn Systems’ vehicle tracking, fleet management system

Pictured above: HandsOn Systems salesperson Matthew Abela (centre), with Polifort Administrator Erdinç Guven (on right) and Assistant Administrator Matthew Mizzi in the presence of Plant Manager Savaşer Yetiş (not in picture)

Turkish construction firm Polifort, which started operating in Malta earlier this year, has acquired the latest vehicle tracking and fleet management system from HandsOn Systems.

The system incorporates real time tracking with the ability to generate reports on individual vehicles or the entire fleet, apart from generating specific alerts in line with Polifort’s requirements. HandsOn Systems are guaranteeing 24×7 support.

Earlier this summer Polifort Administrator Erdinç Guven and Assistant Administrator Matthew Mizzi were given training on the platform to enable them to generate the reports and have access to all the information they would need on a day-to-day basis.

The system includes Driver ID, enabling each driver to be identified with the respective vehicle or vehicles assigned, the monitoring of each vehicle’s fuel consumption and smarter route planning and dispatch.

“Our clients, Polifort, are extremely happy with the system they have acquired,” HandsOn Systems salesperson Matthew Abela said. “We are in the process of installing the trackers on 12 vehicles initially, with 10 already up and running. We will then take it from there.”

According to HandsOn Systems CEO Geoffrey Farrugia, “The industrial application of vehicle tracking is extending beyond regular fleets to more specialised sectors and we see construction as a growth opportunity for HandsOn.”

Among the benefits to construction companies operating their own fleets of vehicles is the ability to constantly monitor the fleet at any given time, with key data on each vehicle. Safety is enhanced and compliance is automated. Productivity can be improved while ensuring employee satisfaction, maximising work-life balance.

The sensors installed on the construction vehicle fleet are more rugged than those in a regular car and can withstand rough working conditions.

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